All posts in Branding

Why You Need a Personal Brand

Your “brand” is the meaning behind your name – the thing that is recognizably “you”. A sort of mental and emotional short-hand, your brand is the collection of thoughts and feelings and experiences that people connect with “you” inside their heads. If there is consistency in these experiences, people begin to associate them with your brand, giving it its own identity.

The real benefit of a brand identity is that it can connect tangible products and services with somewhat intangible ideas like innovation or customer experience. Now when I think of your brand I don’t just think about widgets, I think about trustworthiness and quality of work and accountability; I connect with your brand on an emotional level.

By giving people a way to identify with you on an emotional level, beyond the product or service you offer, that connection runs deeper and is much stronger. When people are able to make that emotional connection, they naturally become more loyal and even become brand advocates.

But there is also incredible value in having a brand on an interpersonal level. By creating a consistent set of expectations about yourself and your work, and meeting those expectations, you see similar rewards. You appear as a more authentic team-mate and leader and you can motivate people to follow you based on their previous experiences with you.

If you can make the work you do synonymous with who you are as a person, you don’t have to convince people to buy into your ideas or products; they will trust the dependable brand they are familiar with and will see value in what you provide just because you’re the one providing it. Wouldn’t it be great for your customers, employees, or teammates to see you as the perfect company, leader, or teammate to help them meet their needs?

So create that brand and use it to guide your personal and professional life. Create that identity that can connect who you are with what you do. Brand your work and your ideas and make them identifiable and familiar for people, and then use the emotional connection they have with you to sell them your ideas.

Exploring the Marketing Technology Landscape – Part Two

Part 2: Dashboards for your Dashboards!

Scott Brinker’s latest “Marketing Technology Landscape” infographic has organized nearly a thousand companies into six categories and various subheadings in an effort to make this landscape a little easier to navigate. Let’s take a moment to look at the headings for the 42 subcategories; you’re sure to notice a few common factors. Continue reading →

Why You Need to Get Creative in Your Customer Research

We want to give customers what they want, and what they need. Every company would agree finding the product or service that your target market has been waiting for should be a top goal. But how do we know what that product is? Or maybe we have a product that a customer just doesn’t know they need yet, so how do we let them know? The key isn’t the blast them with advertisements, no, it’s much more foundational than that: you need to learn more about your customer, and how they should be approached. Continue reading →

The Marketing Myths You Need To Get Out Of Your Head

What comes to mind when you think about marketing? There are so many different things that are all a part of the marketing industry, so it’s fair that people sometimes get confused about what a marketing team really does. A marketing team needs to combine imagination, data, and strategy in order to meet the company-wide goal of increasing sales.

Here are a few of the most common misconceptions that people have about the marketing world, and some things you can respond with if you ever hear them. In order for marketing to be done well, people need to make sure they get these myths out of their head!

Myth 1: Marketing and Advertising Are the Same Thing

Advertising is merely a part of marketing – it is paid publicity that helps a company get people interested in their company, products or services. However, you can’t have smart advertising without market research, strategy, campaign building, or many of the other important steps that a marketing team follows.

Myth 2: Any Marketing is Better Than Nothing

Marketing is expensive, so if you’re going to do it badly, you shouldn’t do it at all. Giving bad impressions can leave marks that take a lot of work to clean up – it’s always better to have a strategy that has your company’s objectives and brand in mind.

Myth 3: The World is Your Audience

It’s impossible to aim for every single person, and if you try you’ll find yourself stretched too thin and losing resources. The more specific you get, the more you’re able to develop a niche market, and that’s where you’ll find success.

Myth 4: Social Media is More Important Than Search Engines

Search engines are still the most important way that people find information on the internet. Although social media is great for customer opinions, and catching up with the newest trends, search engines are responsible for lead generation.

Myth 5: Continuous Communication is Key

Sometimes silence is golden! You don’t always need to be talking over social media, sending emails, or blasting out ad campaigns. Let your customers process – we promise they’re not going to forget about you if you’re not talking to them 24/7.

To get a more comprehensive look at each of these myths, be sure to read our article here.

A Response to Forbes’ Eclectic CMO

The role of CMO is one of the most coveted and sought after positions in a company. It’s a role that combines creativity, leadership, and strategy, and it changes with even the slightest movements in the industry. As the marketing world begins to blend in with other industries, like technology and public relations, the role of a marketing executive also changes.

A recent Forbes article discusses the shifting responsibilities of CMOs, and how the expectations are moving away from the original big-idea strategies, and towards a more diverse set of skills. While having experience in marketing is always going to be an asset, there is also a dire need for digital and technological skills, and experience with operations, public relations, and strategy development.

If you’re able to try your hand at roles in each of those industries you gain powerful connections, and this enables you to become an influence. The value of a following, and maintaining the role of a thought leader, should never be undervalued: you become a voice that has the power to change, not only your company, but the industry.

The way to become the best CMO is to diversify your skill set, and to move beyond the traditional marketing responsibilities. Having a formal background in marketing is no longer the main requirement for holding that executive-level position, because new skills are becoming increasingly more valued.