All posts tagged modern marketing

A Best Practice is a First Practice

Best Practice Pinboard

In marketing, a best practice is an excellent stepping stone towards innovation, but it is not an effective steady state; the value of a message and its means of delivery both degrade with exposure.

Today, many corporations are leveraging technology as a vehicle to communicate with their customers. However, many marketing departments simply employ ‘best practice’ configurations of that technology. They see the industry standard as a utopia of efficiency; a way to guarantee effective technology spend. This is simply not the case.

In many cases, a best practice is a process whose effectiveness is not negatively impacted by its use. In other words, in these cases, continued implementation of the same best practice does not make it any less effective. But there are also cases where effectiveness has a sort of half-life. Consider two common medical best practice scenarios:

1)      Apply direct pressure to a wound to slow bleeding
2)      Administer antibiotics to assist fighting a bacterial infection

Consistent application of the former technique will typically never hinder its effectiveness, as millions of repetitions of this practice, even on the same patient, will generally yield the associated outcome. This is a static best practice. It largely holds true until a better practice is developed to replace it. In the latter scenario, this is not the case. Some bacteria can become resistant to certain antibiotics – largely believed to be attributed to repeat exposure []. As with marketing messages and techniques, this type of best practice is a dynamic best practice – it can degrade with use.

Marketing and Antibiotics
Similar to the antibiotics scenario, the effectiveness of a Marketing Best Practice is directly proportional to the frequency of its usage. Consider this sequence:

  • Marketing technology is rampant[].
  • Innovative marketing departments create processes (message / media combinations) which prove to be effective.
  • Software companies aggregate these processes, defining and sharing ‘best practices’ to increase adoption of their software.
  • Marketing departments are exposed to best practices and begin to mimic them.
  • End customers are continually exposed to the same best practices (the same message/media combination) from multiple brands across multiple channels.
  • The effectiveness of the marketing dwindles with each exposure.

In an attempt to force better results out of the process, marketing departments begin to put undue pressure on content of the message, when the underlying problem is that they are simply mimicking a stale best practice. The audience has received the same message through the same media that has been used so many times before. Any novelty has simply worn off. No content, regardless of quality, can be expected survive this scenario.

A best practice approach is still a dependable methodology, when implementing technologies for the first time. These foundational practices are a great way to ensure you start on the right path. That said; do not expect consistently heroic results from these configurations and practices – especially if your competitors have already exposed your shared audiences to the exact same techniques.

The Marketing Medicine
To tackle this problem, it is critical for a marketing department to foster an environment where processes can be explored and tested against other ideas. This is especially critical for a brand who wants to stay ahead of their competition.

There are some simple first steps to transforming your marketing processes to encourage and drive innovation. They can be done in parallel:

1)      Build a best practice configuration of your marketing technologies
2)      Construct a data-driven, cyclical approach to your campaign planning[]

Building a data-driven, scientific approach to your marketing planning will foster an environment where information can be leveraged to make innovative decisions. A campaign planning structure which includes hypotheses and true experimentation allows organizations to break out from the paralysis that can be caused by relying too heavily on a ‘best practice’ approach.

This cyclical approach draws attention to competitive analysis and an audience-focused message. It complements the KPIs that already exist for marketing effectiveness, but also creates a framework for continued marketing success. Corporate in the infancy of leveraging technology for their marketing efforts actually have an advantage: they have the ability to leap-frog competition who have settled into a best (over-used) practice scenario.

The brands of tomorrow will be shaped by their ability to evolve best practices to better meet their customers’ needs. Those that hope to be lucky enough to continually stumble upon the best content and campaigns will inevitably become obsolete. It is only those brands and marketers that empower themselves to innovate consistently who will succeed.

Exploring the Marketing Technology Landscape – Part 3

Autopilot and Marketing Automation

In Part 1 and Part 2 of this blog series, we asserted the importance of simplifying all that customer data into an integrated system. We also asserted the importance of visualizing it in a user-specific way where we can see all the relevant info on each user in one place, in real time. Besides the obvious implication of a need for simplicity, this also says something about how much time we want to spend on things. Continue reading →

Marketing Campaigns: A Scientific Approach

Modern marketers are using empirical and measurable evidence to prove hypotheses, build learnings and create excitement for solving some of the most difficult problems they face today.

Continue reading →

Exploring The Marketing Technology Landscape – Part One

Part One: Marketing Experiences and Customer Experience Management

Scott Brinker’s “Marketing Technology Landscape” infographic is a revealing, albeit overwhelming look at the martec industry of today. Brinker does simplify things a bit by organizing the nearly one thousand marketing technology companies into several subsections, structured within six broad categories; you will find it is his choice of where to draw the borders that is most revealing. Continue reading →

The Four Key Takeaways from Eloqua Experience #EE13

Just last week, San Francisco was flooded with some of the brightest and most creative marketers in North America. The annual Eloqua Experience conference, hosted by Oracle and Eloqua, was filled with like-minded individuals, notable speakers, and more swag than anyone could bring home in their suitcases. There was much to be learned from every person that walked through the doors, but we’ve narrowed it down to the four most important takeaways from this year’s presentations: Continue reading →